Commit a920225527d02bf6cff21d1aab324acbf708af75

Authored by Olivier
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Removed red color, except for 3 things

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2 2 entering extended mode
3 3 **MarketPaper
4 4 (C:\Users\Olivier\gitlab\market-game\CHIPLAYpaper\MarketPaper.tex
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160 160 %between the number of participants in a crowdsourcing group and the difficulty of the problem in order to find optimal size of groups [ref], and also the possible reactions
161 161 %between competing crowdsourcing groups that can attack and sabotage each other [ref].
162 162  
163   -{\color{blue} Computer games are now a widely used and effective media to complete crowdsourcing tasks \cite{krause2015play}. Multiple studies already investigated the impact of design on human-computing tasks \cite{Krause:2010:FPE,ipeirotis2014quizz,kaufman2016investigating}. Incidentally, they are also an excellent and potentially very powerful framework to study collaborative processes.}
  163 +Computer games are now a widely used and effective media to complete crowdsourcing tasks \cite{krause2015play}. Multiple studies already investigated the impact of design on human-computing tasks \cite{Krause:2010:FPE,ipeirotis2014quizz,kaufman2016investigating}. Incidentally, they are also an excellent and potentially very powerful framework to study collaborative processes.
164 164  
165 165 Historically, computation on graphs has proven to be a good model to study the performance of humans in solving complex combinatorial problems \cite{Kearns:2006aa}. Experiments have been conducted to evaluate the dynamics of crowds collaborating at solving graph problems \cite{DBLP:journals/cacm/Kearns12} but still, little is known about the efficiency of the various modes of interaction.
166 166  
167 167  
... ... @@ -192,9 +192,9 @@
192 192  
193 193 \section{Problem}
194 194  
195   -The game was implemented to solve a graph problem, which is the problem of finding maximal cliques in a multigraph. {\color{red} In simpler terms,
  195 +The game was implemented to solve a graph problem, which is the problem of finding maximal cliques in a multigraph. In simpler terms,
196 196 the goal is to find subsets of vertices in the graph such that any two distinct vertices in the subsets are connected. In the case of this problem, we are dealing with
197   - a multigraph, which is simply a graph that can have multiple parallel edges.}
  197 + a multigraph, which is simply a graph that can have multiple parallel edges.
198 198 Let $G(V,E)$ be a multi-colored graph, where each vertex $v \in V$ has a set of colors $c(v)$. There is a colored edge $e=(v,u) \in E$
199 199 between the vertices $v$ and $u$ for every color in $c(v) \cap c(u)$ ({\em i.e.}, one for every color that they have in common). In other words, there is
200 200 no colored edge between two vertices $v$ and $u$ for which $c(v) \cap c(u) \neq \emptyset$. Let $|C|$ be the total number of colors in the graph.
201 201  
202 202  
203 203  
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445 445 \begin{enumerate}
446 446 \item Percentage of the problem solved
447 447 \item Total experience points earned by the players
448   -\item Average sequence length of the sequences created by the players {\color{red}($\sum_{i=1}^{TS} sL_i / TS$)}
449   -\item Average number of colors in common of the sequences created by the players {\color{red}($\sum_{i=1}^{TS} nbC_i / TS$)}
450   -\item Proportion of sequences of more than one color in common created by the players {\color{red}($(TS - T1C) / TS$)}
  448 +\item Average sequence length of the sequences created by the players ($\sum_{i=1}^{TS} sL_i / TS$)
  449 +\item Average number of colors in common of the sequences created by the players ($\sum_{i=1}^{TS} nbC_i / TS$)
  450 +\item Proportion of sequences of more than one color in common created by the players ($(TS - T1C) / TS$)
451 451 \item Number of circles sold individually to another player
452 452 \item Number of sequences bought from other players (buyouts)
453 453 \end{enumerate}
454   - {\color{red} where $TS$ is the total number of sequences sold by all players during a session, $sL_i$ is the sequence length of sequence $i$,
455   - $nbC_i$ is the number of colors in common of sequence $i$ and T1C is the total number of sequences of one color sold by all players during a session.}
  454 + where $TS$ is the total number of sequences sold by all players during a session, $sL_i$ is the sequence length of sequence $i$,
  455 + $nbC_i$ is the number of colors in common of sequence $i$ and T1C is the total number of sequences of one color sold by all players during a session.
456 456  
457 457 \subsection{Game sessions}
458 458  
459 459 We recruited 120 people in total to test our game. Out of those 120 participants, 35\% were female and 65\% were male. Their average age was 25.7 and average video gaming time
460 460 per week was 4.7 hours.
461   -{\color{red} Roughly 75\% of the participants were undergrad students from McGill University and University of Montreal.
  461 +Roughly 75\% of the participants were undergrad students from McGill University and University of Montreal.
462 462 The other 25\% were grad students and volunteers recruited through social media. Out of all the participants, about half of them were currently studying or working
463   - in computer science.}
  463 + in computer science.
464 464  
465 465 We divided the participants into groups of 10 and repeated three times each of the four
466 466 game conditions presented in the previous subsection.
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472 472 %coming from the experience gained by the players if they played a second time.
473 473 Before starting each game session, the players were shown a document explaining
474 474 the rules of the game and the interface.
475   -{\color{red} The participants were told that they were playing a human computing game that aims to solve a graph problem, but the mathematical problem in question was not described to the players.}
  475 +The participants were told that they were playing a human computing game that aims to solve a graph problem, but the mathematical problem in question was not described to the players.
476 476 %\sout{(to keep the instructions as simple as possible), only the rules of the game.}}
477 477 They were also asked to fill in a questionnaire so that we could get information on the participants, such as their age,
478 478 their abilities at puzzle solving and their experience with video games for example. For all the experiments, the game session lasted 45 minutes.
... ... @@ -869,10 +869,10 @@
869 869 \caption{Average statistics on the top 12 players vs the others.}\label{tab_playerStats}
870 870 \end{table}
871 871  
872   -{\color{red} We also looked at the mean age, mean video game time per week, and mean puzzle solving self evaluation for each of the 12 groups. We used
873   - linear regression to measure the correlation between those mean values and the total experience points gained by all the players of the groups. Mean age and
874   - mean video game time per week have a moderate level of correlation with total experience ($r = -0.67$ and $r = 0.58$ respectively), while mean
875   - self evaluation only exhibits a weak level of correlation with total experience ($r = 0.39$).}
  872 +We also looked at the mean age, mean video game time per week, and mean puzzle solving self evaluation for each of the 12 groups. We used
  873 +linear regression to measure the correlation between those mean values and the total experience points gained by all the players of the groups. Mean age and
  874 +mean video game time per week have a moderate level of correlation with total experience ($r = -0.67$ and $r = 0.58$ respectively), while mean
  875 +self evaluation only exhibits a weak level of correlation with total experience ($r = 0.39$).
876 876  
877 877 \section{Conclusion}
878 878  
879 879  
... ... @@ -908,24 +908,24 @@
908 908 have a strong self evaluation of their puzzle solving skills are able to understand the rules
909 909 of the game and find winning strategies faster than the average participant.
910 910  
911   -{\color{red} In the context of a human computing game, where participants are contributing for free, players' perception and statisfaction with the gameplay is very important.
912   - We asked the players in the questionnaire to rate their experience with the game %on a scale of 1 to 10
913   - and the average score was 71.6\%.
914   - We also gathered some feedback when we were talking to the participants after the sessions.
915   - %As mentioned earlier, people who played the game with the market enjoyed it a lot more than the ones who played without it.
916   - Since the game has no end in itself (we decided to limit the sessions to 45 minutes), some players mentioned that it is very addictive.
917   - %\sout{(some wanted us to release the game publicly so they could play at home)}.
918   - Competing against other players to be at the top of the leaderboard was also a powerful
919   - motivation for the players. Obviously, we also had some negative comments: some players found the game hard to understand, while some very good players found it too easy.
920   - Overall, it is quite interesting to see that players enjoyed the game in its current state without any extensive effort put into visual aesthetics.
  911 +In the context of a human computing game, where participants are contributing for free, players' perception and statisfaction with the gameplay is very important.
  912 +We asked the players in the questionnaire to rate their experience with the game %on a scale of 1 to 10
  913 +and the average score was 71.6\%, which is significantly above average.
  914 +We also gathered some feedback when we were talking to the participants after the sessions.
  915 +%As mentioned earlier, people who played the game with the market enjoyed it a lot more than the ones who played without it.
  916 +Since the game has no end in itself (we decided to limit the sessions to 45 minutes), some players mentioned that it is very addictive.
  917 +%\sout{(some wanted us to release the game publicly so they could play at home)}.
  918 +Competing against other players to be at the top of the leaderboard was also a powerful
  919 +motivation for the players. Obviously, we also had some negative comments: some players found the game hard to understand, while some very good players found it too easy.
  920 +Overall, it is quite interesting to see that players enjoyed the game in its current state without any extensive effort put into visual aesthetics.
921 921  
922   - Another important point for a collaborative game like ours is scalability. In the tests that we have done during the development of the game,
923   - we have noticed that having more players is actually beneficial to the system.
924   - There are more sellers and buyers on the market, which results in a market that is a lot more dynamic (bidders get their circles faster, prices change more often, etc.).
925   - A more dynamic market allows different strategies to be equally profitable (e.g. some players can decide to focus on the Master Trader skill that boosts prices for
926   - selling circles, and then focus entirely on selling individual circles to other players).
927   - We are planning as future work to build an online version of the game that would be available 24/7.
928   - This will allow us to analyze the differences in gameplay and quality of solutions between peak hours (with possibly thousands of players at the same time) and normal hours.}
  922 +Another important point for a collaborative game like ours is scalability. In the tests that we have done during the development of the game,
  923 +we have noticed that having more players is actually beneficial to the system.
  924 +There are more sellers and buyers on the market, which results in a market that is a lot more dynamic (bidders get their circles faster, prices change more often, etc.).
  925 +A more dynamic market allows different strategies to be equally profitable (e.g. some players can decide to focus on the Master Trader skill that boosts prices for
  926 +selling circles, and then focus entirely on selling individual circles to other players).
  927 +We are planning as future work to build an online version of the game that would be available 24/7.
  928 +This will allow us to analyze the differences in gameplay and quality of solutions between peak hours (with possibly thousands of players at the same time) and normal hours.
929 929  
930 930 \section{Acknowledgments}
931 931